Post-Maidan Ukraine and Belarusian Nationalism

9 Apr

BELARUS-THEME-SYMBOLS

Guests:

Sophie Pinkham, doctoral student in Columbia University’s Slavic department. Her recent articles include “Which Ukraine?” and “Watching the Ukrainian Oligarchs” both published in the New Yorker.

Per Rudling, Associate Professor of the Department of History at Lund University in Sweden and author of The Rise and Fall of Belarusian Nationalism, 1906-1931. His most recent article with Tarik Amar is “What Standards Should Be Applied When Deciding to Accept Funds?” published on the History News Network.

Islam Karimov’s Uzbekistan

3 Apr

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Guest:

Paul Stronski is a senior associate in Carnegie’s Russia and Eurasia Program, where his research focuses on the relationship between Russia and neighboring countries in Central Asia and the South Caucasus. He is the author of Tashkent: Forging a Soviet City, 1930-1966 and most recently “Uzbek Elections Preordained, the Real Questions Come Later.”

Kotkin and Zizek Discuss Stalin

1 Apr

Stephen Kotkin and Slavoj Zizek discussed Kotkin’s Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928 at the New York Public Library. Both the audio and video are available on the Library’s site but I thought I’d repost it here to increase exposure.

Child Survivors of Stalin’s Terror and WWII

27 Mar

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Guest:

Cathy Frierson, professor of modern Russian history at the University of New Hampshire. Her books include Peasant Icons: Representations of Rural People in Late 19th Century Russia, All Russia is Burning: A Cultural History of Fire and Arson in Late Imperial Russia, Children of the Gulag, and most recently Silence was Salvation: Child Survivors of Stalin’s Terror and WWII in the Soviet Union.

Nemtsov Murder Reverberations and Early 1930s Armenia

19 Mar

 

Russian PM Putin talks with Chechen leader Kadyrov after arriving in the Chechen town of Gudermes

Guests:

Pavel Baev, a senior researcher at the International Peace Research Institute Oslo. He writes about contemporary Russia for the Eurasian Daily Monitor. His most recent article is Putin’s Disappearing Act May Be Sign of a Leadership Crisis.

Pietro Shakarian, graduate student at the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies at the University of Michigan. He has written widely on Russia and the former Soviet space and maintains his own blog Reconsidering Russia and the Former Soviet Union. He is the editor of The Red Flag at Ararat by Aghavnie Yeghenian and two forthcoming republications Transcaucasia (1854) by Baron August von Haxthausen and Journey to Ararat (1846) by Friedrich Parrot.