Nationalism

The Paradoxes of Lviv

Guest:

Tarik Cyril Amar is an Associate Professor of History at Columbia University specializing in the Soviet Union, Russia, and Ukraine. He’s the author of The Paradox of Ukrainian Lviv. A Borderland City between Nazis, Stalinists, and Nationalists.

Music:

Danger Doom, “Space Ho’s,” The Mouse and the Mask, 2005.

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Russia Through German Eyes

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Guest:

James Casteel is an assistant professor of German, Russian, and Jewish history in the Institute of European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at Carleton University. His research interests include transnational relations between Germany and Russia, nations and empires in central and eastern Europe, and diasporic cultures and belonging. He is the author of Russia in the German Global Imaginary: Imperial Visions and Utopian Desires, 1905-1941.

Music:

Fugazi, “Long Division,” Steady Diet of Nothing, 1991.

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The Use and Abuse of Nagorno-Karabakh

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Guest:

Ryan McCarrel is a Ph.D. Candidate at University College Dublin’s School of Geography where he focuses on geopolitics, borders and world (dis)order. He’s written articles for Foreign Affairs, The Diplomat, Eurasia.net and blogs at the Accidental Geographer. His most recent article in Foreign Affairs is “The United Nations and Sexual Abuse: Why Peacekeeping Reform Has Failed.”

Music:

Midnight Movies, “Persimmon Tree,” Midnight Movies, 2004.

For good information on Nagorno-Karabakh, Armenia, and Azerbaijan, Ryan McCarrel recommends the following:

The Ukrainian Left and the Maidan Protests

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Guest:

Volodymyr Ishchenko is a sociologist studying social protests in Ukraine. He is the deputy director of the Center for Social and Labor Research, a member of the editorial board of Commons: Journal for Social Criticism and the LeftEast web-magazine, and a lecturer at the Department of Sociology at the Kyiv Polytechnic Institute. His is the author of the report The Ukrainian Left During and After the Maidan Protests.

Music: Public Enemy, “Welcome to the Terrordome,” Fear of a Black Planet, 1990.

Russian Culture Under Putin and Ukraine’s Historical Memory Laws

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Guests:

Eliot Borenstein, Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies at New York University. He is the author of Overkill: Sex Violence, and Russian Popular Culture after 1991 and blogs about Russia at All the Russias Blog.

John-Paul Himka, Professor Emeritus in the Department of History & Classics at University of Alberta. He is co-editor with Joanna Beata Michlic of Bringing the Dark Past to Light: The Reception of the Holocaust in Post-Communist Europe. His recent article is “Legislating Historical Truth: Ukraine’s Laws of 9 April 2015” published at Ab Imperio.

Post-Maidan Ukraine and Belarusian Nationalism

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Guests:

Sophie Pinkham, doctoral student in Columbia University’s Slavic department. Her recent articles include “Which Ukraine?” and “Watching the Ukrainian Oligarchs” both published in the New Yorker.

Per Rudling, Associate Professor of the Department of History at Lund University in Sweden and author of The Rise and Fall of Belarusian Nationalism, 1906-1931. His most recent article with Tarik Amar is “What Standards Should Be Applied When Deciding to Accept Funds?” published on the History News Network.

Ukrainian-Russian Relations in Historical Perspective and Putin as Improviser

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Guests:

Faith Hillis, Assistant Professor of Russian History at the University of Chicago and author of Children of Rus’: Right-Bank Ukraine and the Invention of a Russian Nation. Her most recent article is “Intimacy and Antipathy: Ukrainian-Russian Relations in Historical Perspective” published in Kritika.

Andrew Weiss, vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he oversees research in Washington and Moscow on Russia and Eurasia. His most recent article is “Putin the Improviser” in the Wall Street Journal.

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